Children are Born Persons

A Philosophy of Education ~ Chapter 2

Children are Born Persons

“His mind is the instrument of his education and his education does not produce his mind.”  Pg 36

From birth and through the ages counted in months, a child devotes himself to learning by touching, pulling, tearing, throwing, and tasting. He will explore until he knows and then he will go on to something new. He reasons with his unending questions of “Why?”  He has imagination and the knowledge of the difference between right and wrong.

At school-age, “A child comes into their hands with a mind of amazing potentialities.”  Play, environment and motion are all good in education, but ideas are what connect the minds.

“Education, like faith, is the evidence of things not seen.” Pg 39

An idea is born of the spirit and desires to be explored and confirmed. The mind, like the body, begins with the business to grow. The body grows on food and the mind grows on ideas, appearing in stages of life. An idea is presented; we take it in, accept it, and for days after the idea will present itself in various ways, through what we read, people we talk to, and things we will see. This is how adults process ideas and children are no less. Therefore, as educators, it is our business to present the great ideas of life, clothed with facts but released to the child to do with as he chooses, for he knows what to do.

“History must afford it’s pageants, science it’s wonders, literature it’s intimacies, philosophy it’s speculations, religion it’s assurances to every man, and his education must have prepared him for wanderings in these realms of gold.” Pg 43

Every one of these subjects has a purpose, a value to the student.  A good education is broad to touch on many subjects and also equips a child for their exploration of them.

But what of motivation? Can we trust children to seek knowledge on their own accord?  Children hunger for knowledge, not information. The constant barrage of questioning only interrupts a child’s train of thought as they process ideas. It is not the requirement of a teacher to manipulate and control stimulation and attention from the student. If we understand the capacity and requirements of a child’s mind, these things come quite naturally.  They are due the dignity we give ourselves and those around us; children are born persons.

Beautifying the Mind: Picture Studies Pure and Simple

The Purpose Behind Picture Studies

The appreciation of art has the potential to shape the very people we are or are to become morally, intellectually and spiritually.  Charlotte Mason said,

“But we begin to understand that art is… of the spirit, and in ways of the spirit must we make our attempt.”                                        Volume 6, A philosophy of Education, pg 213

Appreciation of art is a skill the self seeks to acquire very naturally as in intelligence, imagination or speech.  It does not require even elementary understanding of art appreciation skills to be able to look at a masterpiece and have it affect you on one or all of these levels.  The purpose behind applying ourselves to this exposure is foremost, character development and secondly, to develop a general interest.  Both are closely tied together to form the roots of aesthetic sense; having a sense of the beautiful or characterized by a love of beauty.

How does art develop character?

Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things.”                                                       Philippians 4:8

When we put beautiful in, beautiful comes out, and that beauty which is stored inside in the form of memory, becomes treasures that cannot be stolen.  Furthermore, these practices help develop observation skills and offer reinforcement to the relationships developed in history, geography, literature and other cultures and socio-economic characteristics.

Practically Speaking

Charlotte Mason practiced picture studies regularly, looking at 6 pieces by one artist every term, and she had three terms a year.  A quick calculation brings us to an easy conclusion that if this is practiced throughout the child’s educational career, upon high school graduation they will have been exposed and considered 39 artists and 234 pieces of art!  Is that not a beautiful accomplishment for a practice that takes 10-30 minutes every two weeks?

When I do a Picture Study, I print out a color 8.5 x 11 reproduction of a single picture for each child.  I found Docucopies.com to be reasonably priced, particularly if I do the printing all at once for the year.  I also decided last year to give each student a binder for their pictures so that they have a sense of ownership of them and feel free to go back and revisit them as often as they like.  We combine this binder with their weekly recitation assignments and it is used regularly.

I will give each student their single picture for the session with the title and date on the back, and allow them to just look at it for 2-3 minutes.  They are encouraged to close their eyes for brief periods during this time and see if they can recreate the image in their mind.  If they can’t, they can open their eyes and continue absorbing the image’s details.

When the time is up, I will have the students flip their pictures over and have them “Tell Back” or narrate what they saw, giving them time and space to reimagine the picture in their mind and share what they recall.  When one student finishes, I will let another student fill in more details until everything has been shared.  Then, we flip the picture back over and review it again.  This time I will point out some details that may have been missed and offer some short biographical or historical information that is relevant to the appreciation of this piece.  This information I collected the night before on the internet.

I have three questions I picked up from John Muir Laws, a nature journalist, that I use to guide our investigations in every subject of study, including art.  I ask my students to consider these three thoughts:  I notice…, I wonder…, and It reminds me of….  These three questions stir just about every consideration the engaged mind might have and helps direct the processing of new ideas in a personal way, awakening curiosity and inquisitiveness.

Older students, maybe 3rd grade and older, might enjoy the reading of a biography of the artist.  It is imperative that this book not be “Twaddle”; just a dry compilation of facts about the artist and their work.  Instead, search for a piece of literature that will create a relationship with the artist.  To do this, we need to get to know them; their character, their thoughts, their challenges, the culture they lived in and how they responded to that culture.

You may ask, “What about form and composition?  When do we discuss color or movement?”  Yes, yes, yes.  These things come all in due time, but try to avoid clouding the study with analysis, sacrificing the relationship and personal joy your student is having.

For the older students, after the second viewing is complete, a great conversation is ready to take place.  Notice I did not say LECTURE.  A conversation requires input from more than one person and that is what you are looking for.  Within that conversation, you can bring up one or maybe two of these concepts as pertinent to the picture.  From a few articles I have a list of questions to choose from but again, I will use only one or two per study and they should be significant to understanding the piece.

  • Describe the use of space
  • What types of shapes do you see? Lines?  Colors?
  • What feelings or emotions do you feel when you look at this picture?
  • If you had done this painting, what would you have called it?
  • What do you think the artist is thinking or feeling while he created this piece? What are they trying to communicate?
  • What is the focal point and why does it stand out?
  • Look at the picture with your eyes half shut to see divisions and shapes of light and shade, balance and tone
  • What is in the foreground? In the background?

Last Minute Pointers

  • As tempting as it may be, be the guide but not the leader.
  • Refrain from sharing your observations and allow your students to find their own.
  • Lessons for younger student should not be longer than 10 minutes, older students can go as long as 30, but it is really nor necessary most of the time.
  • Don’t worry about teaching the different “schools” of artists.  After developing a relationship with 2 or 3 artists from the same school, your student will naturally notice similarities and identifying styles to their own joy and delight.
  • Art is a beautiful way to communicate a culture or time of history.  Try to pair your studies with where you are in your history timeline to offer another dimension to history and literature studies.
  • Lastly, don’t forget to incorporate three-dimensional art like sculptures, engravings, metal and ceramic creations.  An architectural study is fascinating when studying the middle ages.

References

Goegan, N. (2015, August 30). Corot Picture Study. Retrieved from Living Charlotte Mason in California: http://livingcminca.blogspot.com

Jimenez, G. (2007, June 18th). Looking at Art. Retrieved from Bright Kids: http://brightkids.wordpress.com/2007/06/18/looking-at-art/

Laws, J. M. (2016). The Laws Guide to Nature Drawing and Journaling. Heyday.

S, J. (2015, June 10). Artist (Picture) Study Workshop. Retrieved from Charlotte Mason in the Bluegrass: http://www.cminthebluegrass.com/artist-study-workshop.html

Smith, C. (2013, May). Elenor M Frost and the Narration of a “Picture Talk” Part 1 & 2. Retrieved from Charlotte Mason Institute: http://www.charlottemasoninstitute.org

Vencel, B. (2015, September 1). A Beginner’s Look at Picture Study. Retrieved from Afterthoughts Blog: http://www.afterthoughts.net

 

Self Education

Philosophy of Education ~ Chapter 1

Self Education

“A person is not built up from without but from within, that is, he is living, and all external education appliances and activities which are intended to mold his character are decorative and not vital.” Pg 23

 Charlotte Mason had a respect for people that is unprecedented in most educational methods I’m aware of. She insisted that children were not gardens and we, the educators, not the gardeners. How brazen we are to assume we have that level of power and influence over another human being that we can manipulate and form them to our liking.  Education comes from within.

“Life is sustained on that which is taken in by the organism, not by that which is applied from without.”   Pg 24.

We cannot impose our will on another to any level of success more than their willingness to submit to it. Let us consider individuality, personality and independence; hallmarks of our Creator’s fingerprints; To disregard these, is a dishonor.

 Education comes from within. As the body is sustained by food, care and exercise, the mind is sustained upon ideas. Many are out there to be conceived and pondered but let us consider the ideas that influence character and conduct. Charlotte Mason believed these passed from mind to mind and outside educational efforts could not influence them.

 “We feed upon the thoughts of the mind; and thought applied to thought generates thought and we become more thoughtful.” Pg 26.

Just as no one teaches us how to digest food, but that we are born with the ability and desire, so our minds are born with the ability to reason, compare, and imagine and the drive to do it comes from within.

Education comes from within. It is a matter of the spirit; it is and can only be self-education. Our business then becomes to provide these ideas in quality and quantity through books and many of them. The information (facts) from these books hang on a principal, inspired by an idea, and remembered because of the created relationship.

Education comes from within. What are the advantages to this theory? Self-education fits all ages and all levels of aptitude. It secures interest and attention without effort from the teacher. Children learn to express themselves well and develop excellent vocabulary. Parents remain invested in the education. Children delight in books and grow a love for knowledge.  This desire to know is to be differentiated from a student motivated by good marks but failed to consider self-application to the information.

 “I am. I can. I ought. I will.”  Pg 29.

This communicates the power that belongs to the person. We would do right to remember this and respect it if we should hope to encourage a desire to learn for a lifetime in others. That desire is already there but needs to be protected from being extinguished by our own poorly directed intentions.  Education comes from within. 

“The teacher who allows his scholars the freedom of the city of books is at liberty to be their guide, philosopher and friend; and is no longer their instrument of forcible intellectual feeding.”  Pg 32

Music Studies for the Musically UN-Inclined

So, how does a music study work for the musically un-inclined teacher?

Music studies, why do them?  I mean really, with all the information and experiences I am trying to expose my children to day after day, is there really time?  Quite frankly I couldn’t have imagined ever being the one to say, YES!, but here I go.

Last summer, at the CMI retreat in Los Angeles, each daily session was started singing a hymn and a folk song accompanied by a piano.  The first day was a bit awkward for me.  I’m not what you would call musically inclined.  I can’t read notes, challenged at playing a kazoo let alone an instrument made of wood or brass, and though I enjoy worship in church, my voice might be closer to “a beautiful noise unto the Lord”.  However, I walked away from the experience enlightened.

First of all, music is FUN and FUN is a very important aspect of learning!  Music involves self-expression and that is a valuable skill to exercise.  Music is inspirational and as educators, that is one of our goals.  Music has a lovely and subtle connection with history.  Music adds life and depth to both cultural and biblical history and history does the same for music.  Lastly, music can affect our hearts and minds, bringing peace, joy or just a proper perspective to the moment.  In short, from my perspective, music is the color to an otherwise black and white day.

So, how does a music study work for the musically un-inclined teacher?  I started with choosing one hymn and one folk song for each month.  I researched it’s history, printed out it’s verses and found the songs on Spotify or YouTube.  When I introduce the song for the first time, we read through the verses while the music plays and take notes if there are any variances in the wording.  After that, we sing along with the song, finding our timing and melody with the music.  One morning we go over some of the vocabulary they might not understand.  Some mornings we talk about the concepts expressed in the song.  Sometimes I can find a Bible verse that goes with the hymn and we discuss that.  Sometimes the songs have fascinating authors or history and we learn about that.  Each morning we sing one of our songs and discuss one of these aspects until the month is through and the selections are changed.  It has been inspirational, encouraging, funny, thoughtful and interesting.

Will we ever discuss music theory, learn to play an instrument or hire a singing coach?  We’ll see.  But for now, the world of music is filling my home and our hearts as it adds a new layer of interest to our studies.  I know it’s making an impact on our lives because even the dogs have taken to howling with us!

A New Method~ Mastery Based Learning

“Mastery based learning changes the mindset of the student.  An 85% on a test doesn’t brand a child as a B student in their DNA, but impresses them to keep trying, to persevere, to take ownership of their learning.”                                    Sal Kahn, TED Talk, November 2015

 

Because most of us, as educators, have only our experience in traditional academic models to rely on, we often use that understanding to model our home educating experiences.  There is often little reason to challenge these ideas, they are so deeply ingrained in us.  Then a wrench falls into the gears of our finely tuned system of education:  a slow reader, a math struggler or just a squirrely 6 year old, and suddenly there are waves of discontent.  Maybe we recognize that for all we are pouring into the system in the form of money, time and energy, very little progress seems to be happening in the area of learning.  Instead of a growing level of curiosity, we are faced with strong resistance and that leaves us with a great big question mark.  I am so thankful for these points in time!  These are the moments of revelation that require me to throw out the old expectations and open my eyes to new possibilities.  I am forced to truly see my students for who they are and consider their needs as individuals.  I must challenge my expectations, motives and techniques to birth new methods fine-tuned to the child before me, instead of enslaved to tradition, the unrelateable systems of the past.

This is what excites me about this TED Talk by Sal Kahn, of Kahn Academy as he speaks on Mastery based learning.  His presentation makes the point that classroom teaching is not conducive to this approach, but I think it’s a beautiful approach for home schoolers.  Let’s throw out the August to May schedules that come with the curriculum!  Let’s not panic when we come to a lesson that needs a week of investigation and practice, instead of its allotted day!  Let’s break the shackles of a system that doesn’t apply to us by ceasing the practice of dragging students through their journey of learning!  Instead, let’s practice some respect and embrace the amazing little individuals before us.  Let’s run alongside them as their coach as they set the pace for their learning adventure and develop character of fortitude and responsibility.

[Video Link- “Sal Speaks at TED About Mastery-based Learning” November 2015]

It’s worth a watch and I hope you will let me know your thoughts.